Press Room

The Department of Science and Technology (DOST) - Advanced Science and Technology Institute (ASTI), in collaboration with the Commission on Information and Communications Technology (CICT), Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) Forum - Philippines, and Internet Society - Philippine Chapter (ISOC-PH) held the 2011 World IPv6 Day celebration on June  8, 2011 at the CICT. The internet community from different parts of the world simultaneously celebrated this activity. As part of its support for the celebrations, DOST-ASTI is offering an IPv6 technical training from June 9-10, 2011 at the ASTI Training Room to interested participants from the private sector, government, and academe.

The 2011 World IPv6 Day event aims to promote IPv6 adoption in the Philippines as well as prepare Philippine organizations, especially the government, with proper technical knowledge on migration and deployment of the new Internet protocol. The celebration will also convene the Philippine Internet Community to strengthen the advocacy of migration as their role coincides with the government’s promotion of IPv6 through Executive Order (E.O.) 893.

Continuing its advocacy and activities to promote Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) deployment in the Philippines, the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) - Advanced Science and Technology Institute (ASTI) co-organized the World IPv6 Day Celebration on June 08, 2011 at the Commission on Information and Communications Technology (CICT), and held IPv6 technical trainings from June 9-10, 2011 at the ASTI Training Room.

The 2011 World IPv6 Day aims to promote IPv6 adoption in the Philippines, celebrating in sync with internet communities all over the world, whilst the IPv6 Training aims to equip Philippine organizations with right technical know-how on IPv6 migration and deployment.

Why migrate to IPv6?

For the past few decades, the Internet has used Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4). IPv4 uses IP addresses to uniquely identify these electronic devices or hosts, may it be a computer or any other machine. Despite its tremendous success, IPv4 is showing signs of strain, especially, in its limited address space and its fast depletion. To address these concerns, the IPv6 was created.

The newer version IPv6 serves the same function with that of the IPv4 but it does not carry the same limitations. Among the features of the IPv6, are larger addresses, in a way that these become unlimited for everyone, flexible header format, improved options, support for resource allocations and provision for protocol extension. IPv6 preserves everything that is good about today's internet, and adds more features such as stateless auto-configuration, seamless mobility, automated network management, mandated security and new optional service levels.